Southern Poverty Law Center Claims KY Senators’ Lawyer’s Foundation Hosted Racist Speakers

Roy Moore's 5280 pound monument to the 10 Commandments.

Roy Moore's 5280 pound monument to the 10 Commandments.

 

Roy Moore, ex-justice of the Alabama Supreme Court

Roy Moore, ex-justice of the Alabama Supreme Court

 

The Foundation for Moral Law in Montgomery, Ala., hosted the 2010 Alabama Secession Day Commemoration.  According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the event featured speakers tied to the League of the South, a neo-Confederate hate group that considers slavery “God-ordained” and advocates for “the cultural dominance of the Anglo-Celtic people and their institutions.” The Foundation for Moral Law’s president is defrocked Alabama Chief Supreme Court Justice Judge Roy Moore, who is more commonly known as the “Ten Commandments judge.” In the dead of night on July 31, 2001, Moore placed a 2½-ton stone monument with the Decalogue carved on it in the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court building, where he then presided. Moore was thrown out of office in 2003 by Alabama’s Court of the Judiciary after refusing to remove the monument, as he was ordered to do as the result of a federal lawsuit brought by the Southern Poverty Law Center. 

Moore is one of the attorneys representing 35 Kentucky State Senators in the Kentucky Homeland Security lawsuit. For further information, you may link to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the Southern Party of Georgia,  a blog with video from the event, and dailypaul.com. The event was held at Moore’s Foundation for Moral Law. The event claims that it was not sponsored by Moore’s foundation, but the foundation received all proceeds from the event. As noted on dailypaul.com

All Proceeds go to Foundation for Moral Law – NOT Judge Moore’s Gubernatorial Campaign 

This event is a GRASSROOTS event & is NOT sponsored by the Foundation for Moral Law 

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Alabama 10 Commandments Ex-Judge Asks To Join Amici Senators

 

 

The lawyer for the 35 Kentucky state senators who wrote an Amicus Brief has petitioned that Alabama Supreme Court ex-Justice Roy Moore be permitted to participate in the preparation of briefs and oral arguments in support of the Amici.

Ex-Justice Moore is most famous for installing a 5280 pound monument of the 10 Commandments in the rotunda of the Alabama Supreme Court on July 31, 2001, only six months after he was elected to the Supreme Court. The monument was ordered removed by the federal courts. It was moved to a side room on August 27, 2003, and removed completely on July 19, 2004.

The Alabama Canons of Judicial Ethics held a hearing on Judge Moore on November 12, 2003. Moore proudly proclaimed that he would continue to violate the orders of the federal court.  The next day the Canons of Judicial Ethics voted unanimously to remove Moore from office for refusing to follow the orders of the federal courts.

Moore also wrote the original draft of the Constitution Restoration Act, which was first introduced into the U.S. House and Senate in 2004. This bill would have limited the power of the federal judiciary in religious liberty cases, and it would have required the impeachment and filing of criminal charges against federal judges who ruled for separation of church and state. 

The Constitution Restoration Act was part of a continuous attempt by Dominionist Christians to turn America into a theocracy, by seeking to  limit the power of the federal judiciary in religious liberty cases. This act attempted to  “restore” the Constitution, as interpreted by religious extremists.  This act also made the false claim that the founding fathers promoted a Christian nation instead of protecting freedom of religious conscience for all Americans.